Last edited by Mar
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

4 edition of Hospital ships and ambulance trains found in the catalog.

Hospital ships and ambulance trains

John Henry Plumridge

Hospital ships and ambulance trains

by John Henry Plumridge

  • 196 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Seeley in London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain,
  • Great Britain.
    • Subjects:
    • Great Britain. Royal Navy -- Hospital ships.,
    • Hospital trains -- Great Britain.,
    • Great Britain -- Armed Forces -- Transport of sick and wounded.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby John H. Plumridge.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsUG505.G7 P57 1975
      The Physical Object
      Pagination203 p. :
      Number of Pages203
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4934583M
      ISBN 100854220879
      LC Control Number76361569

      There is a similar book "Hospital Ships and Ambulance Trains" which covers the topic well, however this new book is well illustrated and brings the subject matter up to date. The author has obviously worked hard to produce a very in depth look at hospital ships with this book The War on Hospital Ships and I believe he has done so /5(8). 1. Author(s): Plumridge,John H, Title(s): Hospital ships and ambulance trains/ by John H. Plumridge. Country of Publication: England Publisher: London: Seeley.

      Search Engine Resource Pack Ambulance trains This guide details documents and objects relating to the history of ambulance trains. These resources are currently available through Search Engine. Our list of resources is growing, please fill in a comment form with comments or recommendations Books. Archive in context. RAMC Royal Army Medical Corps Muniments Collection. RAMC/ Lieutenant Colonel John H. Plumridge's collection of photographs of casualty evacuation for his book Hospital ships and ambulance trains (London: Seeley, ), and notes, correspondence and drafts for other works. RAMC//2 Photographs, diagrams and newspaper cuttings. RAMC//2/3 All aspects of .

      Stanley B. Burns, MD, the Mercy Street on-set Medical, Historical and Technical Advisor, shares photos from The Burns Archive and an essay about hospitals during the Civil War-era. Get this from a library! Friends in Flanders: humanitarian aid administered by the Friends' Ambulance Unit during the First World War. [Linda Palfreeman] -- The Friends' Ambulance Unit (FAU) was created shortly after the outbreak of war. The idea of the unit's founder, Philip J. Baker, was that it would provide young Friends (Quakers) with the.


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Hospital ships and ambulance trains by John Henry Plumridge Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hospital Ships and Ambulance Trains Hardcover – January 1, by John H. Plumridge (Author) out of 5 Hospital ships and ambulance trains book 3 ratings.

See all 4 formats and editions Hide Cited by: 5. A hospital train is a railway train with carriages equipped for the provision of ically this has ranged from trains equipped to transport wounded soldiers, with basic nursing and first aid facilities on board, to fully equipped mobile medical centres, sometimes including operating theatres and.

Buy Hospital Ships and Ambulance Trains First by Plumridge, J.H. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(3). Hospital Ships And Ambulance Trains book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The author traces the history of the various hospital Ratings: 0.

Such trains were able to connect with hospital ships at French channel ports in order to repatriate wounded British soldiers during the First World War. This is a journal of living and working aboard an Ambulance Train during the first year of World War 1 by a nurse of the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service/5(6).

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Plumridge's "Hospital Ships and Ambulance Trains" has a list of Hospital Ships and other vessels used for the reception, treatment and movement of casualties during the Gallipoli campaign. PageAppendix D. Unfortunately, it is only a list of names, without any dates or other details.

Other details are found elsewhere in the book. In the early days of the First World War, casualties arriving back in Britain were taken from hospital ships at Southampton to the nearby military hospital at Netley.

However, as more and more casualties began to arrive, ambulance trains took passengers to newly opened hospitals across the country. The same book, by Professor Yvonne McEwen, cites that by the end of Ambulance Trains increased from twelve to twenty three.

Grey and Scarlet: letters from the war areas by army sisters on active service has extracts of the war diaries of Nursing Sisters who served aboard hospital trains during the Second World War.

Along the way, the trains’ medical staff saw to their wounds and tried to make the journey comfortable. A Red Cross Train, France, Wounded British soldiers are transferred from a motor ambulance to a Red Cross train, which is on a railway amongst trees. For those being evacuated home, hospital ships provided the next leg of their voyage.

Archive in context. RAMC Royal Army Medical Corps Muniments Collection. RAMC/ Lieutenant Colonel John H. Plumridge's collection of photographs of casualty evacuation for his book Hospital ships and ambulance trains (London: Seeley, ), and notes, correspondence and drafts for other works.

RAMC//2 Photographs, diagrams and newspaper cuttings. RAMC//2/5 Ambulance trains and. Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about The BMJ. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk : George R McRobert.

The FAU made a sustained contribution to the military medical services of the Allied nations, establishing military hospitals, running ambulance convoys, and staffing hospital ships and ambulance trains, treating and transporting wounded men.

(Amazon). As patients arrived from overseas on huge hospital ships, they were moved to hospital trains waiting at the ports. (During WWII, planes were seldom used for medical evacuation. The supply was limited and they were all needed for other duties. In addition, medical air transportation was a new concept which was not well developed.).

See what your friends are reading. Sign up to see what your friends are reading, get book recommendations, and join the world’s largest community of readers. Early career. Phillips was born in Coventry, England in Decemberone of two sons.

His father Edward Phillips, was a local doctor (and an enthusiast in of the benefits of cars for doctors.) He want to St Pauls School in a young man Edward wanted to join the army but family pressure pushed him to medicine: he graduated in medicine from Durham University and the London.

Royal Navy; Hospital trains - Great Britain.; Great Britain - Armed Forces - Transport of sick and wounded. Hospital ships and ambulance trains / by John H.

Plumridge - Details - Trove. » Ambulance Trains» Hospital Barges» Ambulance Flotilla» Hospital Ships Hospital Ship Warilda The book The Roses of No Man's Land by Lyn MacDonald describes the sinking of the Hospital Ship Warilda that was torpedoed after leaving Le Havre on its passage to Southampton on 3 August at am.

There is an account by Sister Jean. Yes, attacking a Hospital ship is a war crime. Hospital ships were covered under the Hague Convention X of [11] But there are restrictions that must be followed: Article four of the Hague Convention X outlined the restrictions for a hospital ship: Ship must be clearly marked and lighted as a hospital ship.

The first scheduled to come were additional ambulance companies and evacuation and field hospitals, intended to function as station hospitals and holding units. On or about D+15 the first general hospital in France, the th, was to disembark and go into operation in Cherbourg.

An ambulance is a medically equipped vehicle which transports patients to treatment facilities, such as hospitals. In some instances, out-of-hospital medical care is provided to the patient.

Ambulances are used to respond to medical emergencies by emergency medical this purpose, they are generally equipped with flashing warning lights and sirens.Hospital Ships List of British Hospital Ships sunk by enemy action.

Stationary Hospitals, Ambulance Trains and Barges and Hospital Ships. Trench Foot Extracts from the 'History of the Great War, Medical Services, Surgery of the War' Volume 1, Edited by Major General Sir W. G. MacPherson, Also a short extract from a book on.Although for most of the WW1 Kate Luard served on the Ambulance Trains, in Casualty Clearing Stations and a Field Ambulance- intermittently she worked in various Stationary and General Hospitals in the base area.

Hospital Ships and Military & War Hospitals at home. Most hospital ships were requisitioned and converted passenger liners.